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S.G.’s Story: A Mother Fights to Ensure That Her Learning Disabled Daughter Gets the Appropriate Education That She Herself Never Received

S.G.’s Story: A Mother Fights to Ensure That Her Learning Disabled Daughter Gets the Appropriate Education That She Herself Never Received

S.G. came to PFCR when she was twelve. Although in the sixth grade, S.G. could not even read at a first-grade level. S.G. had been identified as a student with a disability since she was in the second grade, but her learning issues had never adequately been addressed in the public schools, and she failed to make any progress in reading. Because reading is fundamental to nearly all academics, S.G. was failing almost all of her classes. S.G.’s lack of academic progress was having a devastating effect on her self-esteem and self-confidence, and as a result she was starting to have behavioral issues at school.

S.G.’s mother knew all too well the implications of not receiving an appropriate education. She too has learning disabilities, as a result of which she never learned to read. S.G.’s mother could see her daughter following in her footsteps and was desperate to save her child from the same fate of not receiving a proper education.

The public school’s answer to S.G.’s learning difficulties was to suggest either holding her back in grade level again (she had already been held back once) or to send her to a program designed for children with behavioral issues. Instead, S.G.’s mother enrolled her in a private school that focused on children with learning disabilities, specifically those relating to reading. PFCR was able to obtain a settlement with the DOE to pay the private school tuition.

In the small, supportive environment of the private school, S.G. is finally starting to learn. She is in an appropriate class setting and is receiving academic interventions specially designed to address her learning disability. With her learning needs finally met, S.G. has no behavioral issues and is happy to go to school each day. S.G.’s teachers describe her as a child who is “drinking up” all the knowledge she can.

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